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18:52
Sun
19
Feb 2017

How to download videos from YouTube and other sites in Full HD (1080p)?

If you, just like me, don't like to rely on data stored in the "cloud" (i.e. someone else's computer) and prefer to have it available offline on your hard drive, you probably tried to find a way to download video and music from YouTube and other similar services. There are web pages for that, but they are full of ads, malware and fake "Download" buttons. That's why my favorite way is to use youtube-dl. It works perfectly, is constantly updated and maintained, is open source and supports downloading from almost 1000 (!) different websites, including YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook videos, Soundcloud, Mixcloud and even XXX websites. The only drawback: it's a command line program, so you have to download it and then run it from console with correct parameters. But it's actually quite simple, as you can see below.

To use it, first go to the youtube-dl website and download "Windows executable". It's a single file - youtube-dl.exe, which doesn't need any installation. Just put it in some directory on your hard disk, like I did in F:\Programs.

Next, browse to YouTube or other website, find the video you want to download and copy its URL (link) from address bar to the clipboard. Example: "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0".

Finally, open command prompt. In Windows 10 you can do it e.g. by opening Start menu and searching for "Command Prompt". In the console, issue following commands:

  • F: - to change drive to correct one, if needed.
  • cd \Programs - to enter the directory with your program.
  • youtube-dl.exe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0 - to download video from specific URL.

The video is downloaded to the same directory where you've put the program. Its file name contains title of the video, its YouTube identifier and correct extension, depending on particular video format. For example, mine was: "PSY - GANGNAM STYLE() M_V-9bZkp7q19f0.mp4".

That's all basically, but please keep reading if you want to avoid unpleasant suprises, because there are still two important things to know.

First is that sometimes downloading doesn't work. It happens probably because YouTube changes the way the video is served on their website, like the details of their HTML code. Fortunately youtube-dl is quickly adjusted to it, so if you encounter any download error, you probably just need to update the program to the latest version. You don't even need to go to their website - the program has a feature to update itself. All you need to do is to issue command:

youtube-dl.exe -U

Example:

Second problem is that youtube-dl only downloads YouTube videos in HD (720p) quality, not Full HD (1080p). That's because YouTube provides Full HD video and audio streams separately so they need to be merged on the client side. Good news is that youtube-dl can do it for you. Bad news: it needs additional program for that, called FFmpeg. So to be able to download videos in FullHD quality, you should additionally:

  • Go to FFmpeg Download page and click Windows Builds > Download FFmpeg.
  • Unpack the downloaded archive somewhere, like I did to F:\Programs. This software also doesn't need any installation.
  • Locate its bin subdirectory, where you can find ffmpeg.exe and save its path. In my case it is: f:\Programs\ffmpeg-20170214-8fa18e0-win64-static\bin.

Now, to download Full HD video, issue following console commands:

  • F: - to change drive to correct one, if needed.
  • cd \Programs - to enter the directory with youtube-dl.
  • set PATH=%PATH%;f:\Programs\ffmpeg-20170214-8fa18e0-win64-static\bin - to temporarily add directory with ffmpeg.exe to the PATH environmental variable, so youtube-dl will be able to use it.
  • youtube-dl.exe -f bestvideo+bestaudio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0 - to download video from specific URL using best video and audio quality available.

Now youtube-dl will download the video stream, audio stream and merge them into final file using FFmpeg, so you can enjoy best quality video and audio, downloaded on your hard drive.

Comments (1) | Tags: video internet | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

11:46
Sat
28
Jan 2017

Handy Global Hotkeys for Music Control

I now have a keyboard without "media" keys, so I came up with a set of global hotkeys that I've set up in my music player and consider quite handy. ("Global" means they work in the entire system, also when player application is not in focus.) I can't remember where do they come from, but I think it's possible that I've seen them somewhere. These are:

  • Ctrl+Alt+Insert - Play
  • Ctrl+Alt+Home - Pause
  • Ctrl+Alt+End - Stop
  • Ctrl+Alt+Page Up - Previous track
  • Ctrl+Alt+Page Down - Next track
  • Ctrl+Alt+Arrow Up - Volume up
  • Ctrl+Alt+Arrow Down - Volume down
  • Ctrl+Alt+Arrow Left - Seek back few seconds
  • Ctrl+Alt+Arrow Right - Seek forward few seconds

My favorite music player is foobar2000. To setup new global hotkeys there:

  • Select: File > Preferences
  • Go to: Keyboard Shortcuts
  • For each new hotkey:
    • Search for appropriate action using "Filter list by" and select it. Actions for my hotkeys are:
      • Playback / Play
      • Playback / Pause
      • Playback / Stop
      • Playback / Previous
      • Playback / Next
      • Playback / Volume / Up
      • Playback / Volume / Down
      • Playback / Seek / Back by 5 seconds
      • Playback / Seek / Ahead by 5 seconds
    • Click inside "Key" box and press your hotkey.
    • Check "Global hotkey".
  • Close the dialog window using "OK" button.

I'm sure you can do this in other music players as well, like AIMP.

Comments (1) | Tags: music windows | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

14:07
Wed
21
Dec 2016

3 Rules to Make You Image Looking Good on a Projector

As I go to conferences (and sometimes present my slides), do music visualizations on parties and attend demoscene parties, I started noticing what looks good and what doesn't when presented on a big screen using a projector. It's often not the same thing as you expect when preparing your content and see it on a monitor. The problem is that while monitors usually do pretty good job in representing all shades of colors and brightnesses and we adjust them to see the image from the right distance and in good lighting conditions, with image presented from a projector it's often not the case. You never know what to expect from the quality of the image before you actually enter the venue where you are going to present. That's why I have prepared three simple rules to follow if you want your content to look good on a projector:

1. Use High Contrast

White (or almost white) objects on black background are OK. Black (or almost black) objects on white background are also OK. Gray objects on gray background are not OK. In other words: don't rely on subtle differences in brightness.

Why? Because they may not be visible on the big screen. Sometimes the projector is not powerful enough to ensure sufficient contrast and so everything looks very dark. Sometimes the lighting conditions are such that everything looks very bright. Sometimes the gamma of the image is very different than you experience when preparing your content. (By gamma, I basically mean the curve showing how perceived brightness depends on the brightness value of a pixel.) As a result, all the dark colors may be indistinguishable and completely black, or all the bright colors may be indistinguishable and completely white, or conversely - small difference in pixel brightness can make large difference on the big screen.

So basically use high contrast for all your images. Using subtle differences in pixel brightness for adding some details is OK, but make sure the image looks good and conveys all the key information also without them, relying only on the difference between black and white.

2. Don't Rely on Colors

Monitors can represent most of the colors from sRGB space more or less correctly, but you shouldn't expect the same from a projector. Some colors may seem brighter or darker than expected. Sometimes colors just look completely different on the big screen.

That's why you shouldn't rely on them. Showing some details using colors is OK, but make sure your image looks good and conveys all the key information also without them, relying on brightness alone.

I can remember watching a business presentation where some data was shown on a graph using a yellow line on white background. It was completely invisible on the big screen, so the presenter turned his laptop for us so we could see it. Another time I needed to present on a screen that was lit by a blue lamp and there was no way to turn it off. All parts of the image looked more or less blue and there was no point in using any colors. I even seen a situation where one of RGB components didn't work at all because of the broken cable!

3. Use Big Objects

Use only large font size, prefer big objects of uniform brightness/color and make all lines thick. Don't show any important things as small objects or characters and don't use single-pixel width lines.

Why? Because they may not be readable or visible at all. Sometimes the screen is too small or some viewers sit too far from it. Some people have bad vision and might forget their glasses. Sometimes the image gets downscaled. Many projectors have low resolution. The image quality may just be bad - for example long VGA (D-sub) cable introduces some horizontal blur. I sometimes connect my laptop to a HDMI video switcher that presents itself to the laptop as Full HD (1080p) display, while its output is actually connected to a projector having native resolution of 1024 x 768. I once needed to present on an old projector that didn't have either D-sub or HDMI input, only Composite, S-Video and... a DVD player. Not only I needed a special converter, but also image quality was very bad because standard definition PAL TV signal is only 576i.

For good examples, see demos from Cocoon group (see the group on pouet.net, search YouTube). I think they are not only masterpiece of both technology and art, but they are also deliberately prepared to look great on a big screen by following the rules similar to what I described here.

Comments (2) | Tags: graphics | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

19:06
Mon
12
Dec 2016

Nonbreaking Space and No-Width Optional Break

Wrapping text on word boundaries instead of single character boundaries is a great invention. A text looks so much better when inserted to Word:

Than when printed in oldschool console:

But there are places where we may not want a line break to be possible despite we insert a space. For example, in Europe we use space as thousand separator (and comma as decimal mark) when writing down numbers.

A special character called "nonbreaking space" is very helpful in such cases. You can insert it in Word by clicking: Insert > Symbol > More Symbols > Special Characters > Nonbreaking space. This character looks like space, but it doesn't cause line break.

You can actually see this "invisible" character when you press Ctrl+*. It looks like a small circle or a degree sign.

In HTML you can specify a non-breaking space as:  .

I have discovered quite recently that there is also an opposite special character, called "no-width optional break" or "zero-width space". It is useful in cases where you have a long sequence of characters (like a file path) and you want it to be broken across lines despite it doesn't contain any spaces. It is especially important when you use text justification, because such a long text moved to separate line as a whole can cause an ugly effect:

You can insert this special character in Word (e.g. after every backspace in the path) by clicking: Insert > Symbols > More Symbols > Special Characters > No-width optional break. It occupies no space, but it tells the word processor that a line can be broken at this point. Now it looks much better:

When you press Ctrl+*, you can see this special character depicted as a rectangle.

In HTML you can also use it by typing: ​. It's Unicode "Zero Width Space" character.

Comments (2) | Tags: html | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

19:39
Fri
09
Dec 2016

Operator New and Delete - Unnecessary Conditions

I've seen following constructs many times in C++ code:

MyClass* obj = new MyClass();
if(obj == nullptr)
    // Handle allocation error.

// ...

if(obj != nullptr)
    delete obj;

Both of these conditions are unnecessary. Strictly speaking they are not a bug - program will run correctly, but they make no sense. If you used to write any of these, you should know that:

1. Operator new doesn't return null on failed allocation. By default it throws an exception of type std::bad_alloc in this case, so this is what you should handle if you really care about the state of your program after it runs out of memory (or if the allocated object is particularly big).

There is also special nothrow version of the new operator that returns null on failure, but you must call it explicitly. An alternative would be to overload new operator (global or for particular class) to change its behavior. But again, this is not what happens by default.

Note this is different behavior than malloc function from C. Obviously there are no exceptions in C language, so this function just returns null on failure.

2. Operator delete doesn't crash when you pass null pointer to it - it just does nothing, so the check for not-null is already inside, you don't have to write it. Of course trying to delete object from any non-null address that was already freed or is just invalid address still crashes, or causes other undefined behavior.

Note this is the same behavior as free function from C - it also accepts null pointer.

Comments (1) | Tags: c++ | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

10:21
Wed
30
Nov 2016

32-bit Applications on 64-bit Windows

As you probably know, the processor, operating system and applications on a PC may be 32-bit or 64-bit. CPU-s we have in our computers are 64-bit for a long time already. Windows XP tended to be used in 32-bit version, but now I can see most people use Windows 7/8/8.1/10 in 64-bit version as well. Only apps still exist in various forms. Shell extensions and drivers must match the version of the operating system, but other programs can be used in 32-bit version even on 64-bit system. Different combinations are possible:

  1. 32-bit Windows, 32-bit application
  2. 64-bit Windows, 64-bit application
  3. 64-bit Windows, 32-bit application
  4. 32-bit Windows, 64-bit application - cannot run.

We may ask a question about where does Windows store files and settings of such apps. It is especially interesting as the answer is very counter-intuitive. Location for (2) – 64-bit apps on 64-bit Windows – may contain “32” in its name (because of backward compatibility), while location for (3) – 32-bit apps on 64-bit Windows – may contain “64” (because of the name WoW64). Here is the list of such locations:

Program Files folder:

  1. C:\Program Files
  2. C:\Program Files
  3. C:\Program Files (x86)

System folder:

  1. C:\Windows\System32
  2. C:\Windows\System32
  3. C:\Windows\SysWOW64

Registry key:

  1. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE
  2. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE
  3. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node

(Same applies to HKEY_CURRENT_USER.)

See also: Windows 64-bit: The 'Program Files (x86)' and 'SysWOW64' folders explained

Comments (1) | Tags: windows | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

14:54
Sun
02
Oct 2016

Color Temperature of Your Lighting

In photography, video and all graphics in general there are so much more parameters to consider than just exposure, meaning lighter or darker image. One of them is color temperature, or white balance. It's about what we consider "white" - a frame of reference, especially concerning light source and so all the objects lit by it. It's not real temperature, but we measure it in Kelvins. Paradoxically, lower color temperature values (like 3000K) mean colors that we call "warmer" - more towards yellow, orange or red. Higher temeratures (like 7000K) mean "cooler" colors - more towards blue. Values like 6500K are considered equivalent of a sunlight during the day, while light bulbs usually have around 3000K. Color temperature of your lighting is important when you work with colors on a computer. They recommend to use 6500K light source for that purpose.

I decided to make an experiment. Below you can see photos of part of my room, with a test screen displayed on my monitor, piece of my wall (behind it, supposed to be white) and a piece of furniture (the right part, also should be white). The monitor is LG 23MA73D-PZ, with IPS panel, calibrated to what I believe should be around 6500K (setting Colour Temperature = Warm2).

Left column shows a photo taken in the middle of the night, with lighting by LED lamps having 3000K color temperature. Middle column is the same scene lit by different LED lamps having 6500K. Finally, right column show a photo taken during the day, using only sunlight.

The only remainig variable is white balance of the photo itself. That's why I introduced two rows. Top row show all three photos calibrated to same white balance = 6500K. As you can see, the image on the screen looks pretty much the same on all of them, because monitor emits its own light. But the wall and the furniture, lit by a specific light source, seems orange or reddish on the first photo, while on the other photos it's more or less gray.

Our eyes, as well as cameras can adjust to changing color temperature to compensate for it and make everything looking neutral-white again. So the second row shows same photos calibrated to white balance of the specific light source. Now the wall and the furniture looks neutral gray on all of them, but notice what happened with the image on the screen when light was 3000K - it completely changed colors of the picture, making everything looking blue.

That's why it's so important to consider color temperature of your light sources when working with color correction and grading of photos, videos or some other graphics. Otherwise you can produce an image that looked good at the time of making, but turns out to have some color cast when seen under different lighting conditions. Of course, if you just work with text or code, it doesn't matter that much. It is more important then to just have a pleasant lighting that doesn't cause eye strain, which would probably be something more like the 3000K lamps.

Comments (0) | Tags: video photography graphics | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

11:33
Thu
29
Sep 2016

How to Boost Your RAM to Declared 3000 MHz?

I recently upgraded some components of my desktop PC. I was suprised to discover that RAM doesn't work with declared speed of 3000 MHz. Here is the solution I've found to this problem.

Back in the days of DOS I can remember having to set up everything manually, like selecting IRQ number and DMA channel to make sound working in games. But today, in the era of Plug&Play, assembling a computer is easy and everything works automatically. Almost everything...

Although I found that both my new motherboard (Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3P) and RAM modules (Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4, 32GB(2x16GB), 3000MHz, CL15 (CMK32GX4M2B3000C15)) support 3000 MHz frequency, it worked on 2133 MHz. Motherboard specification says: "Support for DDR4 3466(O.C.) /3400(O.C.) /3333(O.C.) /3300(O.C.) /3200(O.C.) /3000(O.C.) /2800(O.C.) /2666(O.C.) /2400(O.C.) /2133 MHz memory modules", while specification of the memory has "3000MHz" even in its title. What happened? Motherboard spec calling all the frequencies higher than 2133 "OC" (like in "overclocking") gave me some clue that it is not standard.

After few minutes of searching on Google, I've learn about a thing called XMP (Extreme Memory Profile). It's an extension to SPD (Serial Presence Detect) - a protocol used by RAM modules to report to the motherboard what parameters do they support. I then checked in the specs that my motherboard, as well as my memory support XMP 2.0.

So what I finally did was:

  1. I restarted my PC.
  2. I entered BIOS/UEFI during boot with [Del] key.
  3. I located a setting related to XMP. It is called "Extreme Memory Profile(X.M.P.)".
  4. I changed it from "Disabled" to "Profile1" - the only other option available.
  5. I exited BIOS with saving changes.

That's all! Fortunately I didn't need to manually set any frequency, timings or voltage of my Skylake processor, memory or any other components, like overclockers do. With all the other settings left to default "Auto", the computer still works stable and RAM now runs with 3000 MHz frequency.

By the way: Please don't be worried when you see only half of this frequency in HWiNFO64 tool as "Memory - Current Memory Clock". All in all we are talking about DDR here, which means "Double Data Rate", so the real frequency is just that, but data is transferred on both rising and falling edge of the clock signal.

Warning! It turned out that enabling XMP on my machine makes it working very unstable. Firefox, The Witcher 3 and basically all memory-intensive applications crashed randomly. So if you experience similar issues, you better disable XMP or, if you know any better solution, please post a comment about it.

Comments (3) | Tags: hardware | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

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