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All blog entries, ordered from most recent. Entry count: 1107.

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# Make Your Game Friendly for Graphics Debugging and Optimization - My Talk from Digital Dragons 2019

Fri
07
Jun 2019

I've recently gave a talk at Digital Dragons conference in Kraków, Poland. It wasn't very technically advanced this time. Most of it should be understandable to everyone working on games - artists, programmers, producers... I've published slides on GPUOpen.com blog, along with slides my colleagues presented last month at other events across Europe. See: AMD at Digital Dragons and Vulkanised Conference.

Comments | #productions #graphics #games #teaching Share

# Remote programming job is usually not an option

Fri
10
May 2019

Every programmer these days receives lots of job offers from recruiters, especially if having profile on LinkedIn. Some people make fun of it. I used to ignore or reject them, telling that “sorry, I’m not looking for a new job at the moment, I’m happy with my current one”. For some time I started to do something different - I tell them that I’m not interested in relocation to California/​London/​Germany/​Iceland/​South Korea/​wherever and ask if I can work remotely. The answer is usually “no”.

This is contrary to a popular belief that programmers can often work from home. I have a remote job now, but this one is unique and I know such job is hard to find. Maybe it’s more frequent when someone develops web pages, mobile apps, or other small programs that a single person can make. A freelancer hunting for specific projects and tasks may have an opportunity to work from anywhere in the world. But if you want to work in a team of many programmers developing a large and complex project, they usually expect you to be full time on site.

You can come from any place in the world and have a great coding talent. You can study solid computer science at your local university or even learn by yourself from the Internet. But it’s unlikely you can make a world-class career or take part in state-of-the-art, innovative projects while staying in your small home town. For that you have to move to one of these technology hubs, like Silicon Valley. This is despite the developments in telecoferencing, Skype, Slack, etc.

Here are screenshots of 12 chats I had with recruiters on LinkedIn since the beginning of this year. I told them I don’t want to relocate and asked them if I could work remotely. 11 of them said “no”. Only 1 said it’s possible.

Comments | #career Share

# Vulkan: Long way to access data

Thu
18
Apr 2019

If you want to access some GPU memory in a shader, there are multiple levels of indirection that you need to go through. Understanding them is an important part of learning Vulkan API. Here is an explanation of this whole path.

Let’s take texture sampling as an example. We will start from shader code and go from there back to GPU memory where pixels of the texture are stored. If you write your shaders in GLSL language, you can use texture function to do sampling. You need to provide name of a sampler, as well as texture coordinates.

vec4 sampledColor = texture(sampler1, texCoords);

Earlier in the shader, the sampler needs to be defined. Together with this definition you need to provide index of a slot where this sampler and texture will be bound when the shader executes. Binding resources to slots under different numbers is a concept that exists in various graphics APIs for some time already. In Vulkan there are actually two numbers: index of a descriptor set and index of specific binding in that set. Sampler definition in GLSL may look like this:

layout(set=0, binding=1) uniform sampler2D sampler1;

What you bind to this slot is not the texture itself, but so-called descriptor. Descriptors are grouped into descriptor sets – objects of type VkDescriptorSet. They are allocated out of VkDescriptorPool (which we ignore here for simplicity) and they must comply with some VkDescriptorSetLayout. When defining layout of a descriptor set, you may specify that binding number 1 will contain combined image sampler. (This is just an example way of doing this. There are other possibilities, like descriptors of type: sampled image, sampler, storage image etc.)

VkDescriptorSetLayoutBinding binding1 = {};
binding1.binding = 1;
binding1.descriptorType = VK_DESCRIPTOR_TYPE_COMBINED_IMAGE_SAMPLER;
binding1.descriptorCount = 1;
binding1.stageFlags = VK_SHADER_STAGE_FRAGMENT_BIT;

VkDescriptorSetLayoutCreateInfo layoutInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_DESCRIPTOR_SET_LAYOUT_CREATE_INFO };
layoutInfo.bindingCount = 1;
layoutInfo.pBindings = &binding1;

VkDescriptorSetLayout descriptorSetLayout1;
vkCreateDescriptorSetLayout(device, &layoutInfo, nullptr, &descriptorSetLayout1);

VkDescriptorSetAllocateInfo setAllocInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_DESCRIPTOR_SET_ALLOCATE_INFO };
setAllocInfo.descriptorPool = descriptorPool1; // You need to have that already.
setAllocInfo.descriptorSetCount = 1;
setAllocInfo.pSetLayouts = &descriptorSetLayout1;

VkDescriptorSet descriptorSet1;
vkAllocateDescriptorSets(device, &setAllocInfo, &descriptorSet1);

When you have descriptor set layout created, as well as descriptor set based on it allocated, you need to bind the descriptor set as current one under set index 0 in the command buffer that you fill before you can issue a draw call that will use our shader. Function vkCmdBindDescriptorSets is defined for this purpose:

vkCmdBindDescriptorSets(
    commandBuffer1,
    VK_PIPELINE_BIND_POINT_GRAPHICS,
    descriptorSetLayout1,
    0, // firstSet
    1, // descriptorSetCount
    &descriptorSet1,
    0, // dynamicOffsetCount
    nullptr); // pDynamicOffsets

How do you setup the descriptor to point to a specific texture? There are multiple ways to do that. The most basic one is to use vkUpdateDescriptorSets function:

VkDescriptorImageInfo imageInfo = {};
imageInfo.sampler = sampler1;
imageInfo.imageView = imageView1;
imageInfo.imageLayout = VK_IMAGE_LAYOUT_SHADER_READ_ONLY_OPTIMAL;

VkWriteDescriptorSet descriptorWrite = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_WRITE_DESCRIPTOR_SET };
descriptorWrite.dstSet = descriptorSet1;
descriptorWrite.dstBinding = 1;
descriptorWrite.descriptorCount = 1;
descriptorWrite.descriptorType = VK_DESCRIPTOR_TYPE_COMBINED_IMAGE_SAMPLER;
descriptorWrite.pImageInfo = &imageInfo;

vkUpdateDescriptorSets(
    device,
    1, // descriptorWriteCount
    &descriptorWrite, // pDescriptorWrites
    0, // descriptorCopyCount
    nullptr); // pDescriptorCopies

Please note that this function doesn’t record a command to any command buffer. Descriptor update happens immediately. That’s why you need to do it before you submit your command buffer for execution on GPU and you need to keep this descriptor set alive and unchanged until the command buffer finishes execution.

There are other ways to update a descriptor set. You can e.g. use last two parameters of vkUpdateDescriptorSets function to copy descriptors (which is not recommended for performance reasons), as well as to use some extensions, e.g.: VK_KHR_push_descriptor, VK_KHR_descriptor_update_template.

What we write as value of the descriptor is reference to objects: imageView1 and sampler1. Let’s ignore the sampler and just focus on imageView1. This is an object of type VkImageView. Like in Direct3D 11, an image view is a simple object that encapsulates reference to an image along with a set of additional parameters that let you “view” the image in a certain way, e.g. limit access to a range of mipmap levels, array layers, or reinterpret it as different format.

VkImageViewCreateInfo viewInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_IMAGE_VIEW_CREATE_INFO };
viewInfo.image = image1;
viewInfo.viewType = VK_IMAGE_VIEW_TYPE_2D;
viewInfo.format = VK_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8_UNORM;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.aspectMask = VK_IMAGE_ASPECT_COLOR_BIT;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.baseMipLevel = 0;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.levelCount = 1;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.baseArrayLayer = 0;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.layerCount = 1;

VkImageView imageView1;
vkCreateImageView(device, &viewInfo, nullptr, &imageView1);

As you can see, image view object holds reference to image1. This is an object of type VkImage that represents actual resource, commonly called “texture” in other APIs. It is created from a rich set of parameters, like width, height, pixel format, number of mipmap levels etc.

VkImageCreateInfo imageInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_IMAGE_CREATE_INFO };
imageInfo.imageType = VK_IMAGE_TYPE_2D;
imageInfo.extent.width = 1024;
imageInfo.extent.height = 1024;
imageInfo.depth = 1;
imageInfo.mipLevels = 1;
imageInfo.arrayLayers = 1;
imageInfo.format = VK_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8_UNORM;
imageInfo.tiling = VK_IMAGE_TILING_OPTIMAL;
imageInfo.initialLayout = VK_IMAGE_LAYOUT_UNDEFINED;
iamgeInfo.usage =
    VK_IMAGE_USAGE_TRANSFER_DST_BIT | VK_IMAGE_USAGE_SAMPLED_BIT;
imageInfo.sharingMode = VK_SHARING_MODE_EXCLUSIVE;
imageInfo.samples = VK_SAMPLE_COUNT_1_BIT;

VkImage image1;
vkCreateImage(device, &imageInfo, nullptr, &image1);

It’s not all yet. Unlike previous generation graphics APIs (Direct3D 9 or 11, OpenGL), image or buffer object doesn’t automatically allocate backing memory for its data. You need to do it on your own. What you actually need to do is to first query the image for memory requirements (required size and alignment), then allocate memory block for it and finally bind those two together. Only then the image is usable as a means of accessing the memory, interpreted as colorful pixels of a 2D picture.

VkMemoryRequirements memReq;
vkGetImageMemoryRequirements(device, image1, &memReq);

VkMemoryAllocateInfo allocInfo = {
    VK_STRUTURE_TYPE_MEMORY_ALLOCATE_INFO };
allocInfo.allocationSize = memReq.size;
allocInfo.memoryTypeIndex = 0; // You need to find appropriate index!

VkDeviceMemory memory1;
vkAllocateMemory(device, &allocInfo, nullptr, &memory1);

vkBindImageMemory(
    device,
    image1,
    memory1,
    0); // memoryOffset

In production quality code you should of course check for error codes, e.g. when your allocation fails because you run out of memory. You should also avoid allocating separate memory blocks for each of your images and buffers. It is necessary to allocate bigger memory blocks and manage them manually, assigning parts of them to your resources. You can use last parameter of the binding function to provide offset in bytes from the start of a memory block. You can also simplify this part by using existing library: Vulkan Memory Allocator.

Comments | #graphics #vulkan Share

# WinFontRender - my new library

Thu
14
Mar 2019

Displaying text is a common problem in graphics applications where all you can do is to render textured quads. I've implemented my solution already back in 2007, as part of my old engine The Final Quest 7, which was my master thesis. I've recently come back to this code and improved it because I needed it for the personal project I now work on. Then I thought: Maybe it's a good idea to extract this code into a library? So here it is:

» WinFontRender - small single-header C++ library that renders Windows fonts in graphics applications

It does two things:

1. It renders characters of the font to a texture, tightly packed.

2. It calculates vertices needed to render given text.

Here are more details about the library:

Comments | #graphics #libraries #productions Share

# Vulkan Memory Allocator Survey March 2019

Mon
04
Mar 2019

Are you a software developer, use Vulkan and the Vulkan Memory Allocator library (or at least considered using it)? If so, please spend a few minutes and help to shape the future of the library by participating in the survey:

» Vulkan Memory Allocator Survey March 2019

Your feedback is greatly appreciated. The survey is anonymous - no personal data is collected like name, e-mail etc. All questions are optional.

Comments | #productions #libraries #vulkan Share

# Programming FreeSync 2 support in Direct3D

Sat
02
Mar 2019

AMD just showed Oasis demo, presenting usage of its FreeSync 2 HDR technology. If you wonder how could you implement same features in your Windows DirectX program or game (it doesn’t matter if you use D3D11 or D3D12), here is an article for you.

But first, a disclaimer: Although I already put it on my “About” page, I’d like to stress that this is my personal blog, so all opinions presented here are my own and do not reflect that of my employer.

Radeon FreeSync (its new, official web page is here: Radeon™ FreeSync™ Technology | FreeSync™ 2 HDR Games) is an AMD technology that covers two different things, which may cause some confusion. First is variable refresh rate, second is HDR. Both of them need to be supported by a monitor. The database of FreeSync compatible monitors and their parameters is: Freesync Monitors.

Read full entry > | Comments | #gpu #directx #windows #graphics Share

# Programming HDR monitor support in Direct3D

Wed
27
Feb 2019

I got an HDR supporting monitor (LG 32GK850F), so I started learning how I can use its capabilities programatically. I still have much to learn, as there is a lot of theory to be ingested about color spaces etc., but in this blog post I’d like to go straight to the point: How to enable HDR in your C++ DirectX program? To test this, I used 3 graphics chips from 3 different PC GPU vendors. Below you can see results of my experiments.

Read full entry > | Comments | #graphics #windows #directx #gpu Share

# How to design API of a library for Vulkan?

Fri
08
Feb 2019

In my previous blog post yesterday, I shared my thoughts on graphics APIs and libraries. Another problem that brought me to these thoughts is a question: How do you design an API for a library that implements a single algorithm, pass, or graphics effect, using Vulkan or DX12? It may seem trivial at first, like a task that just needs to be designed and implemented, but if you think about it more, it turns out to be a difficult issue. They are few software libraries like this in existence. I don’t mean here a complex library/framework/engine that “horizontally” wraps the entire graphics API and takes it to a higher level, like V-EZ, Nvidia Falcor, or Google Filament. I mean just a small, “vertical”, plug-in library doing one thing, e.g. implementing ambient occlusion effect, efficient texture mipmap down-sampling, rendering UI, or simulating particle physics on the GPU. Such library needs to interact efficiently with the rest of the user’s code to be part of a large program or game. Vulkan Memory Allocator is also not a good example of this, because it only manages memory, implements no render passes, involves no shaders, and it interacts with a command buffer only in its part related to memory defragmentation.

I met this problem at my work. Later I also discussed it in details with my colleague. There are multiple questions to consider:

This is a problem similar to what we have with any C++ libraries. There is no consensus about the implementation of various basic facilities, like strings, containers, asserts, mutexes etc., so every major framework or game engine implements its own. Even something so simple as min/max function is defined is multiple places. It is defined once in <algorithm> header, but some developers don’t use STL. <Windows.h> provides its own, but these are defined as macros, so they break any other, unless you #define NOMINMAX before the include… A typical C++ nightmare. Smaller libraries are better just configurable or define their own everything, like the Vulkan Memory Allocator having its own assert, vector (can be switched to standard STL one), and 3 versions of read-write mutex.

All these issues make it easier for developers to just write a paper, describe their algorithm, possibly share a piece of code, pseudo-code or a shader, rather than provide ready to use library. This is a very bad situation. I hope that over time patterns emerge of how the API of a library implementing a single pass or effect using Vulkan/DX12 should look like. Recently my colleague shared an idea with me that if there was some higher-level API that would implement all these interactions between various parts (like resource allocation, image barriers) and we all commonly agreed on using it, then authoring libraries and stitching them together on top of it would be way easier. That’s another argument for the need of such new, higher-level graphics API.

Comments | #gpu #vulkan #directx #libraries #graphics #c++ Share

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