Tag: events

Entries for tag "events", ordered from most recent. Entry count: 121.

Warning! Some information on this page is older than 3 years now. I keep it for reference, but it probably doesn't reflect my current knowledge and beliefs.

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23:40
Mon
19
May 2014

Simple 2-digit Method of Task Management

Managing some list of tasks to do (or "TODO list") is very important skill that helps in both work and everyday life. I usually use GTD (Getting Things Done) method. But sometimes, like on the recent Hack3city competition, a simpler method is more suitable.

A lot could be said about this subject (maybe some day I write an article or prepare a presentation about it). Generally, tasks to do can be organized based on different criteria, like:

Even after "filtering" only tasks that you can do and you should as soon as possible, they can be sorted in three different "dimensions":

  1. Difficulty: how difficult/big/time consuming the task is.
  2. Importance: How important is it to do this or consequences of not doing it.
  3. Urgency: How much this task should be done as soon as possible.

It's obvious that not all the tasks will be done. During a 2-day programmers' competition, just like in everyday life, writing down ideas for doing things is good, but there is never enough time to complete them all. That's why there is a need for some method of deciding what to do next. During Hack3city, I came up with a simple, ad hoc method, which I want to describe here. The goal of developing it was to make the bookkeeping of the list as quick and easy as possible.

During a hackathon like Hack3city, where we created most of our game in just 2 days, the 3rd dimension is not important. Sure sometimes something must be coded quickly because artist or level designer is waiting for it to be able to continue his work. Then I do this first. But otherwise all tasks are equally urgent - they should be done in the short amount of time, during the event. So what I did was I opened the system Notepad and started writing down tasks and all ideas that should be/could be added to our game, one line each. But instead of starting a line with "-" for just a bullet, I started it with two digits, meaning:

Normally I just delete lines with tasks I finished, but since some time during the event, I started to move them to "DONE" section instead to show them later in this post. So here is partial task list from our game:

23 smoke effect when player falls onto the ground
22 flashlight rotates when player dies
23 flashlight rotates following player walking animation
31 spear, shooting from a wall when player pushes a button
12 delay appearance of "game over" text
22 push button
12 door that can be opened
13 red eye of zombie should pulse and blink
13 graphics in the menu instead of text
31 sound effects
33 fix ladder climbing animation
31 fix double-jump bug
22 walking sound effects should be played randomly
12 parallax for moving background
21 bug: player death animation doesn't work
11 playsoft logo
12 music
12 zombie: add hysteresis to the decision weather approach the player
21 death from the spikes
12 turning flashlight on and off
22 there are some bugs/spiders walking on the floor
33 a spiked ball on a chain, hanging and swinging from the ceiling

Of course the list of tasks was constantly changing as artist, level designer and me came up with new ideas or decided that something is more or less important, found new bugs during testing etc. But I tried to concentrate on finishing one thing at time. When finished, I picked up next task to do according to following rule: I reviewed whole list to find a task with the smallest sum of its numbers. So the order in which I was doing the tasks was:

This way we managed to accomplish most of the tasks we planned so we were quite satisfied with our game as it looked and worked pretty much as we planned. That's why I believe this simple 2-digit method of managing task list is good for hectic, time-constraint and constantly changing work environment.

Comments (2) | Tags: events competitions productivity hack3city | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

21:36
Wed
14
May 2014

Hack3city 2014 - Review

5-11 May 2014 there was first edition of Hack3city - a hackathon in Gdańsk, Poland. It was interesting and unusual in many ways. First of all, there were 4 different tracks, so each developer could choose what is interesting to him.

Teams could have up to 3 people. Of course I was in the Playsoft track. We made a game together with Arek Duchnowski and Marcin Szymczak, who work in aideMMedia.

On Monday evening there was an official beginning (and free beer :) That's when themes of each track were announced. During the week we could work on our projects from home. On Saturday and Sunday (including the night) we were invited to work all together in an open space in Starter.

Also on Saturday organizers announced additional "diversifiers" (like on Global Game Jam). Fulfilling them was additional plus. For games, they were like "graphics is black and white", "game is controlled with one button" or... "game includes Playsoft logo". You could imagine how such logo might be used in a game themed "fear of the dark" :)

On Saturday and Sunday we have 3 meals - all for free (and free beer at the end :) There were mentors representing the sponsoring companies available in place so we could ask them for help.

There were totally 19 teams participating in all tracks. Most of them were in the gamedev track. Projects were evaluated by a jury based on a 5-minute presentation and there were winners selected in each track. Some teams just presented their applications, while others focused on delivering a PowerPoint presentation. Finally we took 3rd place. See also more about Our game from Hack3city 2014.

Among teams that were creating a game, Unity was the most popular technology. That's also what we have used. But there were different technologies present too, like C++ with Marmalade (which was officially recommended and the prize for 1st place was a license for this library), JavaScript and... Lisp (or Scheme, to be more specific). During work, many interesting stuff could be learn and overheard, like what do artist say when they want to insult programmers: "lerpuj kwaterniona", which means: "go lerp quaternion" :)

But the event was not only about programming. Maybe because it was organized by and in the Starter, it had a "startup feeling". For me it looked like many people, while being programmers, were more focused on money and business than technology. Maybe the culmination of it was presentation of an application that helps with first aid - shows information about how to help injured person, helps measuring rate of artifical respiration etc. Someone from the audience asked a question: "Do you have business model?" Someone else from the audience answered jokingly: "If you want to save someone's life, please first watch this ad".

Overall I think the event was well organized. Rules and general feeling was somehow similar to Global Game Jam, still quite unique and different in many details. I don't know if it's a good idea to announce the theme on Monday and allow working during whole week. Developers with lots of free time have advantage over these who study, have family or a full-time job. I also didn't like the idea of presenting each project 3 times instead of only at the end. It took lots of precious time that we could spend on coding and also made the final presentation less of a suprise. Everything else was great (did I mention free beer?), so I recommend attending this event when it will be organized next time!

Comments (1) | Tags: hack3city competitions events | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

16:44
Sun
02
Feb 2014

Global Game Jam 2014

Last time I wrote about our game Ball-B, and today I'd like to say few words about the Global Game Jam in general. For those of you who don't know: It is a worldwide one-weekend event about making games. But it's not just a virtual event where people stay at home and communicate via the Internet. Different organizations around the world share their place so people come to meet and work together as teams. There were 6 sites in Poland. In Warsaw for example, PolyJam 2014 was organized by Poloygon interest group in Warsaw University of Technology. Our site in Gdańsk, called 3city Game Jam (see homepage, entry on globalgamejam.org, Facebook page), was in the office of gamedev studio Playsoft. It was the biggest site in Poland and - according to page Jam Sites by Size - 38th in the world our of 488 with 111 participants. And there was also a waitlist of those who didn't register on time because of limited capacity of the office!

Organizers encouraged us to use Chronolapse to record a time-lapse video from screenshots taken from our desktops in the background. That's an interesting program - I didn't know it before. Unfortunately it didn't work after I connected external monitor to my laptop (despite it claims it supports dual monitor), so finally I didn't use it. They also recorded a time-lapse video from all 48 hours in the office, but I guess it isn't posted on the Internet yet.

The theme this year was a sentence "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are." It's so general it could be interpreted quite freely, but many games were about changing a point of view by e.g. switching between different types of characters or some references to psychology. In our site the event had a form of a competition. Voting was using the system just as it's usually done on Warsztat compos and IGK conference - everyone had to choose 3 games (except his own) and give one of them 3 points, one - 2 one - 1. My favourite games were:

  1. Thirst for Freedom. They made 2D game using Unity with isometric view and the map fitting the screen, divided into cells. Player is in a psychiatric hospital. He can change beween two characters - one has schizophrenia and sees the world as colourful, with rainbows and unicorns, while the second one has depression and sees everything as gray and sad. They see the same map differently so they have to collaborate to solve logical puzzles and go out of the map to the next level.
  2. Feel Colored. They also made 2D game in Unity. 3 people playing using 3 pads on same computer shoot each other on a 2D map, fitting the screen, with side view. The screen is divided into 3 colors that are constantly changing, rotating around the center. When player is in the range of his color, he is invincible to the bullets (or something like that). For me that was a very interesting and novel idea.
  3. identikit. They coded in C++ using their custom engine. What's most interesting though is that they used Occulus Rift and the Creative+Intel Color+Depth camera, so it is a virtual reality game. The game is about walking in corridors, waching and choosing paintings on walls. Choices made create psychological portrait of the player according to some psychological theory.

While the winners were:

  1. Get Some Dots. Made in Unity. The game is about shooting in a top-down view. Interesting idea here is that objects (including bullets) move only in the are that the player is facing. Everyting behind him is slowed down. The game is clearly inspired by SuperHot
  2. Thirst for Freedom - mentionel above.
  3. Our game :D

Comments (7) | Tags: competitions events ggj | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

00:01
Thu
30
Jan 2014

Ball-B - Our Game at Global Game Jam 2014

Here is the game we made during this year's Global Game Jam. It's called Ball-B. The goal is to defend the base at the center of the arena. You are rolling a physically simulated ball (using arrow keys or WSAD) of one of 5 kinds, each one (except the green one) having a special ability activated with Space. ESC key shows menu.

The game is made in Unity, so it works on the web page (if you have Unity Web Player installed) and can be build for multiple desktop as well as mobile platforms.

Play Online

Windows Binary: Ball_B_Windows.zip (8.78 MB)

Source Code: Ball_B_Source.zip (20.4 MB)

See also Ball-B at globalgamejam.org

One week before the jam I decided to learn Unity a little bit instead of make a game using custom C++ technology, as I always did before. Arek, who is doing 2D graphics at work, also a week ago decided to learn making 3D graphics. So it was a new and interesting experience for both of us. We made our game in same team as last year, only without Klamacz (who now lives in Czech Rapublic and works in Bohemia Inteactive). Our roles were:

I was the only programmer in the team and I didn't try to be the leader of the team or a designer, so I could say the game was artist-driven - most of the time developed considering how things should look like. Which is a good approach. Of course not everything went right and there are many things we could have done better. But it was fun to participate. In the competition at our site we scored 3rd place.

Comments (3) | Tags: competitions events productions ggj | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

12:40
Sat
18
Jan 2014

Global Game Jam 2014 - Next Weekend

Next weekend - 24-26 January 2014 - there will be next edition of Global Game Jam - probably the biggest game development competition in the world. Well, it's not actually a competition. But it's about creating games with given theme, in teams, in 48 hours. Any technology can be used - programming languages like C++, game engines like Unity. You can even make a board game!

May sites around the world host this event. Sites registered in Poland this year will be in: Łódź, Poznań, Cieszyn, Warszawa, Kraków and Gdańsk. The one in my city - Gdańsk - is called 3City Game Jam and it's organized by Playsoft Games in their office, just like the year before.

It's always fun to do something creative together, so I really encourage to leave the work earlier next Friday (or skip some lessons) and go spend that weekend programming/drawing/modelling/designing/drinking coffee and participating in this event. Last year we created a game called Octovirus :)

Comments (1) | Tags: events competitions ggj | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

19:03
Sat
14
Dec 2013

(PL) Pisząc kod natywny C/C++... - Prezentacja

Zapraszam do obejrzenia slajdów z mojej prezentacji zatytułowanej "Pisząc kod natywny C/C++, czyli nie taki diabeł straszny", którą pokazałem dzisiaj podczas targów Kariera Programisty.

Comments (0) | Tags: productions events | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

17:06
Mon
11
Nov 2013

Silly Venture 2013 - My Photos

8-11 November 2013 there was another edition of Atari demoscene party - Silly Venture 2013. Click on the image to see my photos from this event (quite big gallery this time :)

Silly Venture 2013 - Photos

If I had to summarize the party in just one sentence, I'd say that even if you - just like me - have nothing to do with Atari computers and just like demoscene, it's definitely worth visiting Gdańsk in November to go to this party. This scene is big. There were total 113 compo entries this year! (graphics + music + intro + demo + game + wild, in many different categories, for different Atari platforms).

There is also:

Comments (2) | Tags: atari demoscene events | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

20:05
Tue
05
Nov 2013

(PL) Targi Kariera Programisty

Targi Kariera Programisty (Strona na Facebook) to wydarzenie odbywające się w różnych miastach Polski, podczas którego profesjonaliści mogą skontaktować się z firmami poszukującymi pracowników. Udział jest bezpłatny, ale wymaga wcześniejszej rejestracji.

Edycja w Gdańsku odbędzie się 14 grudnia 2013. Będzie tam można m.in. posłuchać mojej prezentacji, która nosi tytuł:

"Pisząc kod natywny C/C++, czyli nie taki diabeł straszny"

Na podstawie swojego doświadczenia zawodowego opowiem, jaki charakter ma praca programisty piszącego kod natywny w C/C++, w jakich zastosowaniach używa się takich języków oraz z jakimi problemami trzeba się tam zmierzyć. Postaram się pokazać, że warto wybrać tę ścieżkę kariery oraz że nie jest ona taka trudna, jak mogłoby się wydawać. Zapraszam serdecznie :)

Comments (0) | Tags: events | Author: Adam Sawicki | Share

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