Vulkan: Long way to access data

# Vulkan: Long way to access data

Thu
18
Apr 2019

If you want to access some GPU memory in a shader, there are multiple levels of indirection that you need to go through. Understanding them is an important part of learning Vulkan API. Here is an explanation of this whole path.

Let’s take texture sampling as an example. We will start from shader code and go from there back to GPU memory where pixels of the texture are stored. If you write your shaders in GLSL language, you can use texture function to do sampling. You need to provide name of a sampler, as well as texture coordinates.

vec4 sampledColor = texture(sampler1, texCoords);

Earlier in the shader, the sampler needs to be defined. Together with this definition you need to provide index of a slot where this sampler and texture will be bound when the shader executes. Binding resources to slots under different numbers is a concept that exists in various graphics APIs for some time already. In Vulkan there are actually two numbers: index of a descriptor set and index of specific binding in that set. Sampler definition in GLSL may look like this:

layout(set=0, binding=1) uniform sampler2D sampler1;

What you bind to this slot is not the texture itself, but so-called descriptor. Descriptors are grouped into descriptor sets – objects of type VkDescriptorSet. They are allocated out of VkDescriptorPool (which we ignore here for simplicity) and they must comply with some VkDescriptorSetLayout. When defining layout of a descriptor set, you may specify that binding number 1 will contain combined image sampler. (This is just an example way of doing this. There are other possibilities, like descriptors of type: sampled image, sampler, storage image etc.)

VkDescriptorSetLayoutBinding binding1 = {};
binding1.binding = 1;
binding1.descriptorType = VK_DESCRIPTOR_TYPE_COMBINED_IMAGE_SAMPLER;
binding1.descriptorCount = 1;
binding1.stageFlags = VK_SHADER_STAGE_FRAGMENT_BIT;

VkDescriptorSetLayoutCreateInfo layoutInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_DESCRIPTOR_SET_LAYOUT_CREATE_INFO };
layoutInfo.bindingCount = 1;
layoutInfo.pBindings = &binding1;

VkDescriptorSetLayout descriptorSetLayout1;
vkCreateDescriptorSetLayout(device, &layoutInfo, nullptr, &descriptorSetLayout1);

VkDescriptorSetAllocateInfo setAllocInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_DESCRIPTOR_SET_ALLOCATE_INFO };
setAllocInfo.descriptorPool = descriptorPool1; // You need to have that already.
setAllocInfo.descriptorSetCount = 1;
setAllocInfo.pSetLayouts = &descriptorSetLayout1;

VkDescriptorSet descriptorSet1;
vkAllocateDescriptorSets(device, &setAllocInfo, &descriptorSet1);

When you have descriptor set layout created, as well as descriptor set based on it allocated, you need to bind the descriptor set as current one under set index 0 in the command buffer that you fill before you can issue a draw call that will use our shader. Function vkCmdBindDescriptorSets is defined for this purpose:

vkCmdBindDescriptorSets(
    commandBuffer1,
    VK_PIPELINE_BIND_POINT_GRAPHICS,
    descriptorSetLayout1,
    0, // firstSet
    1, // descriptorSetCount
    &descriptorSet1,
    0, // dynamicOffsetCount
    nullptr); // pDynamicOffsets

How do you setup the descriptor to point to a specific texture? There are multiple ways to do that. The most basic one is to use vkUpdateDescriptorSets function:

VkDescriptorImageInfo imageInfo = {};
imageInfo.sampler = sampler1;
imageInfo.imageView = imageView1;
imageInfo.imageLayout = VK_IMAGE_LAYOUT_SHADER_READ_ONLY_OPTIMAL;

VkWriteDescriptorSet descriptorWrite = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_WRITE_DESCRIPTOR_SET };
descriptorWrite.dstSet = descriptorSet1;
descriptorWrite.dstBinding = 1;
descriptorWrite.descriptorCount = 1;
descriptorWrite.descriptorType = VK_DESCRIPTOR_TYPE_COMBINED_IMAGE_SAMPLER;
descriptorWrite.pImageInfo = &imageInfo;

vkUpdateDescriptorSets(
    device,
    1, // descriptorWriteCount
    &descriptorWrite, // pDescriptorWrites
    0, // descriptorCopyCount
    nullptr); // pDescriptorCopies

Please note that this function doesn’t record a command to any command buffer. Descriptor update happens immediately. That’s why you need to do it before you submit your command buffer for execution on GPU and you need to keep this descriptor set alive and unchanged until the command buffer finishes execution.

There are other ways to update a descriptor set. You can e.g. use last two parameters of vkUpdateDescriptorSets function to copy descriptors (which is not recommended for performance reasons), as well as to use some extensions, e.g.: VK_KHR_push_descriptor, VK_KHR_descriptor_update_template.

What we write as value of the descriptor is reference to objects: imageView1 and sampler1. Let’s ignore the sampler and just focus on imageView1. This is an object of type VkImageView. Like in Direct3D 11, an image view is a simple object that encapsulates reference to an image along with a set of additional parameters that let you “view” the image in a certain way, e.g. limit access to a range of mipmap levels, array layers, or reinterpret it as different format.

VkImageViewCreateInfo viewInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_IMAGE_VIEW_CREATE_INFO };
viewInfo.image = image1;
viewInfo.viewType = VK_IMAGE_VIEW_TYPE_2D;
viewInfo.format = VK_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8_UNORM;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.aspectMask = VK_IMAGE_ASPECT_COLOR_BIT;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.baseMipLevel = 0;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.levelCount = 1;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.baseArrayLayer = 0;
viewInfo.subresourceRange.layerCount = 1;

VkImageView imageView1;
vkCreateImageView(device, &viewInfo, nullptr, &imageView1);

As you can see, image view object holds reference to image1. This is an object of type VkImage that represents actual resource, commonly called “texture” in other APIs. It is created from a rich set of parameters, like width, height, pixel format, number of mipmap levels etc.

VkImageCreateInfo imageInfo = {
    VK_STRUCTURE_TYPE_IMAGE_CREATE_INFO };
imageInfo.imageType = VK_IMAGE_TYPE_2D;
imageInfo.extent.width = 1024;
imageInfo.extent.height = 1024;
imageInfo.depth = 1;
imageInfo.mipLevels = 1;
imageInfo.arrayLayers = 1;
imageInfo.format = VK_FORMAT_R8G8B8A8_UNORM;
imageInfo.tiling = VK_IMAGE_TILING_OPTIMAL;
imageInfo.initialLayout = VK_IMAGE_LAYOUT_UNDEFINED;
iamgeInfo.usage =
    VK_IMAGE_USAGE_TRANSFER_DST_BIT | VK_IMAGE_USAGE_SAMPLED_BIT;
imageInfo.sharingMode = VK_SHARING_MODE_EXCLUSIVE;
imageInfo.samples = VK_SAMPLE_COUNT_1_BIT;

VkImage image1;
vkCreateImage(device, &imageInfo, nullptr, &image1);

It’s not all yet. Unlike previous generation graphics APIs (Direct3D 9 or 11, OpenGL), image or buffer object doesn’t automatically allocate backing memory for its data. You need to do it on your own. What you actually need to do is to first query the image for memory requirements (required size and alignment), then allocate memory block for it and finally bind those two together. Only then the image is usable as a means of accessing the memory, interpreted as colorful pixels of a 2D picture.

VkMemoryRequirements memReq;
vkGetImageMemoryRequirements(device, image1, &memReq);

VkMemoryAllocateInfo allocInfo = {
    VK_STRUTURE_TYPE_MEMORY_ALLOCATE_INFO };
allocInfo.allocationSize = memReq.size;
allocInfo.memoryTypeIndex = 0; // You need to find appropriate index!

VkDeviceMemory memory1;
vkAllocateMemory(device, &allocInfo, nullptr, &memory1);

vkBindImageMemory(
    device,
    image1,
    memory1,
    0); // memoryOffset

In production quality code you should of course check for error codes, e.g. when your allocation fails because you run out of memory. You should also avoid allocating separate memory blocks for each of your images and buffers. It is necessary to allocate bigger memory blocks and manage them manually, assigning parts of them to your resources. You can use last parameter of the binding function to provide offset in bytes from the start of a memory block. You can also simplify this part by using existing library: Vulkan Memory Allocator.

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