Tag: events

Entries for tag "events", ordered from most recent. Entry count: 136.

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# Slavic Game Jam 2019 and our project

Thu
25
Jul 2019

Over the last weekend I took part in Slavic Game Jam 2019 in Warsaw, Poland. (See website, Facebook event, games at itch.io). It was a big one - over 200 participants, many of them coming from different countries all around Europe. The event started on Thursday with a session of talks in 2 parallel tracks. In the evening there was a pre-party in VooDoo club, with electronic music played from GameBoys and live visuals. The jam started on Friday with the announcement of the theme which was "growth". As always, this was just an inspiration, so participants were free to make any kinds of games.

During the event there was food provided, as well as fruits and vegetables, coffee, and ice cream - all for free, included in the ticket price. Also during the event there was "HydePark" organized in a separate room - something like a small Slot Art Festival where people could reserve time slots to organize their events of any kind - like a talk, a workshop, playing video games, or playing some instruments. It made me wonder if people could come to SGJ, not make any game and still enjoy themselves all the time!

The official communication between the organizers and participants happened on a designated Discord server. Organizers kept us informed about everything what's important by posting announcements to @everyone. And there was a lot happening. For example, they asked us to deliver an exactly 3-second video from our games, from which they later assembled this showreel. They were also making quality photos and posting them during the jam on the Facebook event.

The deadline for games was on Sunday midday. What's interesting is that SGJ was non competitive this time. There were no presentations of the games on stage, no voting or judging by any jury, no winners or prizes. Instead of that, everyone needed to prepare their game to be played by others at their desk. I liked that. I think it might even feel somewhat like preparing a booth at some game expo if taken seriously. Finally, as every good party has a before- and after-party, so in the evening we went to a bar :)

To summarize, I think that in some way it's quite easy to organize a (normal) game jam. You need not invite speakers like for a conference. You need not provide any hardware, as people will bring their own laptops. All you need to do is to have some venue booked for a weekend, and some marketing to invite people to come. Possibly that's why there are so many of such events. My friend once said that taking part in game jams can become a lifestyle - you can go to one almost every week. But SGJ was different. There was so much happening and it was so well organized that I'm sure it required enormous work from everyone involved. Congratulations to the entire crew, KNTG Polygon group from Warsaw University of Technology, volunteers and others!

Regarding the games created during the jam, I could see most of them were developed using Unity. Other technologies were used as well. There were few mobile games, few board games... I couldn't see many VR games. I was developing a game in a team of two, together with my friend Thomas Pendragon - just two programmers. We were planning to use Unreal but we eventually used Unity. We ended up making this game: see entry at itch.io (including binary download for Windows and MacOS).

In our game, you need to "grow" your city by creating a balanced number of places of 5 types (red for building, green for park, blue for water, yellow for airport, gray for road). The city visualization on the left is just eye-candy. You play a tile-matching game like Candy Crush Saga, but with one twist. In the bottom-center there is a Tetris-like indicator that goes up every time you make a match of some color. When all colors are matched, the bottom row is cleared - like in Tetris. If any color goes all the way to the top, you lose, so you need to consider which colors do you match to keep a good balance. That makes the game more strategic. Points are calculated for every match - more if you match 4 or 5 in a row or if something else is matched in the same move. How many points can you reach? The record during the jam was above 1000.

Thomas gave initial idea and designed the game. He did some coding (like the city building on the left), composed the music, added sound effects, made some graphics in Blender, and assembled the rest from some assets. I coded the core logic of the matching game, the whole UI, and juicing, like particle effects and animations.

As a post-mortem of this little project, here is the list of what went right:

What went wrong?

Comments | #productions #competitions #unity #events Share

# Global Game Jam 2019 - my impressions

Thu
31
Jan 2019

Last weekend the 2019 edition of Global Game Jam took place - a worldwide event where teams od developers gather in different sites all around the world to make games during two days and two nights. There was a large site in my city (Warsaw) - PolyJam, but I decided to go to Gdańsk to participate it their local site called Hackerspace Game Jam together with my friends.

Theme this year was "what home means to you". As always, participants interpreted it very differently. Those who have families associated home with all kinds of troubles caused by the other residents. Pooplers - the game I liked the most - is about babies crawling around the house and pooping competitively to cover as much surface as possible with their specific color, while avoiding the mother :) Home Alone: Cat edition is about a cat that can destroy and drop stuff from the shelves, all in first person perspective. Kapeć Defender is about a man who throws slipper (pol. "kapeć") at the wife and other people to be able to just sit and watch TV. There were more sci-fi settings as well. I liked the game Gwiezdni Somsiedzi a lot. It is the only one with multiplayer over network. Players have to control satellites flying in space, catch asteroids and throw them at the other players. Another space game was Glop where players have to cooperatively control various devices on the surface of a planet to make it fly, as well as shoot at incoming obstacles.

When it comes to technology, most teams used Unity engine. Some used JavaScript with some game framework. There was just 1 VR game. Many games included multiplayer on a single computer using gamepads, one included networked multiplayer.

Our team was a group of friends from the demoscene - 2 ex-Intel C++ developers and 2 DevOps currently working in a bank. Unfortunately we had no graphics artists. Although I would prefer to use Unity or Unreal Engine these days, we eventually decided to go the hard way and code in C++ using dxfw - the old framework developed by Krzysiek K., based on Direct3D 9. I had to remind myself this old technology before the jam, including all these D3DRS_ fixed-function pipeline states and D3DX math library. By the way: If the last version of DirectX SDK for DX9 was released in June 2010, can we already consider it a retro platform, along with Atari and Amiga? ;)

We used FMOD library for playing sound and music and Gainput for handling input from gamepads. We started from having a ray-traced sphere, so we had to code all the game logic and rendering from scratch, including displaying characters, UI, collisions, etc. We've developed some of the logic in C++ and some in Squirrel, because we had this scripting language already integrated with the framework. I had no previous experience with Squirrel, so I had to learn it very quickly. After going through the documentation, I concluded that I love it! It looks like a great scripting language for simple applications. It's not perfect, e.g. it lacks vector and matrix types so necessary in game development (just like pretty much every other programming language except HLSL/GLSL), but I like its simplicity and syntax. It is very similar to Lua in its overall philosophy - dynamically typed, object oriented, and based on key-value arrays. The syntax is not that weird though. It seems to follow the "principle of least astonishment" - it's very similar to C++, arrays are indexed from 0, plus ending statements with a semicolon is optional - end of line also works.

Participating in an event such as GGJ is always an adventure and an opportunity for many new experiences - much better than just sitting on the Internet at home. During this jam I not only learned Squirrel as a new programming language, but I've also heard what is it like to work as a programmer at a bank, I've registered on Asana (a web service for organizing TODO lists, just like Trello which I used before), and of course I had an opportunity to practice quick and dirty programming, as opposed to code carefully thought out and tested, like it has to be done in a regular job.

Finally, the game we've made is here: LazerBugz. It is a twin-stick shooter happening on a spherical surface of a planet. The "home" is the cosmic base that you have to defend while shooting at alien bugs and going out to gather randomly placed gems. It supports local co-op for any number of players using Xbox gamepads or keyboard and mouse. Some screenshots and a photo of people playing our game:

There was a competition on our site. We didn't take any of the first 3 places. We just got mention among the games who received a good number of votes. The game that won was Clash of T-Rexes - kind of Pong with two dinosaurs standing on two planets.

Official photo gallery from the event: Hackerspace Game Jam 2019

Comments | #productions #competitions #ggj #events Share

# "Co działa szybko, a co wolno w grafice 3D?" - talk at Collegium da Vinci

Tue
20
Nov 2018

(EN) This post will be in Polish because it's an invitation for my talk, which will happen 7th December 2018 in Collegium da Vinci in Poznań, and it will be in Polish.

(PL) Wszystkich zainteresowanych tworzeniem gier (także w Unity czy Unreal Engine, niekoniecznie zaawansowanym programowaniem grafiki w C++) mam przyjemność zaprosić na mój wykład pt. „Co działa szybko, a co wolno w grafice 3D?”, który odbędzie się 7 grudnia 2018 na uczelni Collegium Da Vinci w Poznaniu, w ramach cyklu spotkań „INTERAKCJE”.

Opis: Grafika 3D jest istotną częścią współczesnych gier video, a jej wydajne renderowanie jest niezbędne do płynnego działania gier w czasie rzeczywistym. Znajomość podstaw tej dziedziny jest przydatna niezależnie od wybranej technologii (np. Unity, Unreal Engine czy własny silnik pisany w C++). Wykład stanowi przegląd technik stosowanych w grafice renderowanej z użyciem współczesnych GPU z podkreśleniem, które z nich mogą stanowić problem wydajnościowy oraz jakimi sposobami można uzyskać lepszą wydajność.

Comments | #teaching #graphics #events Share

# Porting your engine to Vulkan or DX12 - video from my talk

Fri
06
Jul 2018

Organizers of Digital Dragons conference published video recording of my talk "Porting your engine to Vulkan or DX12":

PowerPoint slides are also available for download here: Porting your engine to Vulkan or DX12 - GPUOpen.

Comments | #vulkan #directx #teaching #events #video Share

# My upcoming 3 talks

Fri
11
May 2018

I'd like to invite you to my upcoming talks:

Tuesday 15 May at Czestochowa University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, I will talk about computer graphics. Topic is: "Grafika komputerowa jako kreatywna dziedzina informatyki".

One week later I will give more advanced talk, in English this time. At Digital Dragons conference in Kraków I will talk about "Porting your engine to Vulkan or DX12". Later that week I will discuss the same subject at Nordic Game conference in Malmö.

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# A MAZE in Berlin - my impressions

Fri
04
May 2018

Last week I've been on A MAZE - an event in Berlin advertsed as "7th International Games and Playful Media Festival". I went there together with a large group of people from Polygon - gamedev interest group from Warsaw University of Technology. I liked it a lot because it's something different from what I've attended before, and I've been on many events, like gamedev conferences (e.g. GDC), demoscene parties (e.g. Revision), gaming expo (e.g. Poznań Game Arena), cybersport events (e.g. World Cyber Games), or events decated to retro computers.

A MAZE could be described as independent games festival. Majority of events took place between Thursday and Saturday. Its main part was game exhibition, where booths with many games were available for visitors to play or talk to their developers. They were indie games, so either very artistic, containing some original gameplay ideas, unusual controller, or somehow politically involved. Contrary to expo at GDC, there were no AAA titles, no big publishers, IHVs or middleware developers. There were some really polished and commercially successful games though, e.g. SUPERHOT.

Second big part of the event were talks happening on two stages. Again, they were very "alternative", often delivered by artists or academics. They either discussed some ideas or artistic vision behind some game, touched politics (of course all from the left side of political scene, e.g. about helping migrants, women, and other minorities), or they were purely fun. There was very little about programming and nothing about advanced rendering technology. Most of indie developers use Unity. I attended one of the workshops about Unity, but it was very basic - speaker explained what is bool, int etc.

Besides, there were concerts every evening with bands or DJs playing, VJs making visualizations, lots of beer and other festival fun :) I recommend attending A MAZE at least once to anyone interested in games or game development, just because it's so different from other events. Plus it happens in Berlin, and I love the atmosphere of this city :)

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# Memory management in Vulkan and DX12: slides are online

Tue
03
Apr 2018

Slides from my talk at Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2018: "Memory management in Vulkan and DX12" are now available online, as part of materials from Advanced Graphics Techniques Tutorial. Access to this PDF is open to anyone, not behind GDC Vault paywall. I've put some additional information in "backup" slides at the end that I didn't show during my presentation. The slides are designed the way that you can learn from them even without seeing the talk.

Update 2018-05-04: Slides from my talk in PPTX format with additional notes are now available (together with many other GDC 2018 presentations) on page: GDC 2018 Presentations - GPUOpen.

Comments | #events #teaching #gdc #directx #vulkan Share

# Memory management in Vulkan and DX12 - my talk at GDC 2018

Wed
21
Feb 2018

If you happen to come to this year's Game Developers Conference (GDC), I'd like to invite you to my talk: "Memory management in Vulkan and DX12". During this lecture I will not only advertise my Vulkan Memory Allocator library, but I will also show technical details, tips and tricks for GPU memory management that you can use on your own when programming using Vulkan or Direct3D 12.

List of presentations made by my colleagues at AMD can be found here: GDC 2018 Presentations - GPUOpen, and list of all GDC talks is available as Session Scheduler on gdconf.com.

Comments | #vulkan #directx #gdc #events #teaching Share

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