Tag: productions

Entries for tag "productions", ordered from most recent. Entry count: 130.

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# D3d12info - Printing D3D12 GPU Information to Console

Wed
27
Jul 2022

My next little hobby project is D3d12info. It is a Windows console program that prints all the information it can get about the current GPU installed in the system, as seen through Direct3D 12 API. It also fetches additional information through AMD GPU Services (on AMD cards), NVAPI (on NVIDIA cards), Vulkan, and WinAPI, mostly to identify the current version of the graphics driver and Windows system. I will try to keep it updated to the latest Agility SDK, to query it for support for the latest hardware features of the graphics card.

I share it under open-source MIT license. You can see full source code in the GitHub repository and download compiled binary from the Releases tab.

The tool can be compared to DirectX Caps Viewer you can find in your Windows SDK installation under path "c:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\bin\*\x64\dxcapsviewer.exe" in terms of the information extracted from DX12. However, instead of GUI, it provides a command-line interface, which makes it similar to the "vulkaninfo" tool. Information is printed in a human-readable text format by default, but JSON format can be selected by providing -j parameter, making it suitable for automated processing. Additional command-line parameters are supported, including a choice of the GPU if there are many installed in the system. Launch it with parameter -h to see the command-line syntax.

In the future, I would like to extend it with a web back-end that would gather a database of various GPUs and driver versions, like Vulkan Hardware Database does for Vulkan, and to make it browsable online. As far as I know, there is no such database for D3D12 at the moment. Best we have right now are the tables about Direct3D Feature Levels on Wikipedia. But that will require a lot of learning from me, as I am not a good web developer, so I will think about it after my vacation :)

Comments | #productions #tools #directx #gpu Share

# SimplySaveAs - a Small Tool for Perforce Users

Wed
29
Jun 2022

In my old article "Tips for Using Perforce" I promised to dedicate a separate article to what I described there in point 10, so here it is. First, let's talk about the problem. When using a version control system, e.g. Git or Perforce, you surely sometimes inspect the history of a file, to see who changed it, when, and what exactly has been changed throughout its previous versions. GUI clients of such systems offer convenient views to compare text files, but sometimes you may just need to save an old version of the file on your disk - not to update it in your main working copy, but to export it to a separate folder.

In some applications, this is easy. For example, Git Extensions, my favorite GUI client for Git, offers File History window that shows revision history of a selected file. In this window, we can right-click on a specific revision from the list and click "Save as" to export that specific version of the file to a new location on disk.

Unfortunately, in Perforce there is no such command. There is History tab that shows the list of revisions of a selected file. It also offers context menu under right mouse button to do something with a selected revision, but among the commands to diff etc. there is no "Save As", only "Open With". This one allows us to choose some application and open the file with it, which might be useful in case of text files or some other documents (e.g. DOCX, PDF) that we just want to preview using their dedicated app. But what if it is a binary file, having some non-standard extension, that we just want to export to disk?

Here is where the little tool I developed might be useful. SimplySaveAs is a Windows program that you can use to "Open With" a file in Perforce. All it does is show a "Save As" window that lets you choose a place and name where the file should be saved on your disk. This way, the external tool provides the command missing in Perforce visual client (P4V).

The program doesn't need any installation. The repository linked above also contains full source code in C++, but all you need to download is just the file "SimplySaveAs.exe". You can put it in any location on your disk. I like to have a separate directory "C:\PortablePrograms\", where I put all the portable applications that don't need installation, like this one.

First time you want to use it, you need to click on Open With > Choose Application... in Perforce and select "SimplySaveAs.exe" from your disk.

On every next use, Perforce will remember this program and show it available in the context menu, so you can just click Open With > SimplySaveAs.

How does it work? As you may know, opening a file with a program actually needs to save the file on a disk somewhere, likely in a temporary folder, and then launching the program with a path to this file passed as a command-line parameter. This is also what Perforce does when we use "Open With" command. So all my program does is ask the user for a target path and then copy the file from the source, temporary location read from the parameter to the target location selected by the user.

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# Vulkan Memory Allocator 3.0.0 and D3D12 Memory Allocator 2.0.0

Sat
26
Mar 2022

Yesterday we released new major version of Vulkan Memory Allocator 3.0.0 and D3D12 Memory Allocator 2.0.0, so if you are coding with Vulkan or Direct3D 12, I recommend to take a look at these libraries. Because coding them is part of my job, I won't describe them in detail here, but just refer to my article published on GPUOpen.com: "Announcing Vulkan Memory Allocator 3.0.0 and Direct3D 12 Memory Allocator 2.0.0". Direct links:

Vulkan Memory Allocator

D3D12 Memory Allocator

Comments | #rendering #directx #vulkan #gpu #libraries #productions Share

# VkExtensionsFeaturesHelp - My New Library

Thu
01
Apr 2021

I had this idea for quite some time and finally I've spent last weekend coding it, so here it is: 611 lines of code (and many times more of documentation), shared for free on MIT license:

** VkExtensionsFeaturesHelp **

Vulkan Extensions & Features Help, or VkExtensionsFeaturesHelp, is a small, header-only, C++ library for developers who use Vulkan API. It helps to avoid boilerplate code while creating VkInstance and VkDevice object by providing a convenient way to query and then enable:

The library provides a domain-specific language to describe the list of required or supported extensions, features, and layers. The language is fully defined in terms of preprocessor macros, so no custom build step is needed.

Any feedback is welcome :)

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# AquaFish 2 - My Game From 2009

Thu
06
Aug 2020

I've made a short video showing a game I developed more than 10 years ago: AquaFish 2. It was my first commercial project, published by Play Publishing, developed using my custom engine The Final Quest.

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# Vulkan Memory Allocator - budget management

Wed
06
Nov 2019

Querying for memory budget and staying within the budget is a very needed feature of the Vulkan Memory Allocator library. I implemented prototype of it on a separate branch "MemoryBudget".

It also contains documentation of all new symbols and a general chapter "Staying within budget" that describes this topic. Documentation is pregenerated so it can be accessed by just downloading the repository as ZIP, unpacking, and opening file "docs\html\index.html" > chapter “Staying within budget”.

If you are interested, please take a look. Any feedback is welcomed - you can leave your comment below or send me an e-mail. Now is the best time to adjust this feature to users' needs before it gets into the official release of the library.

Long story short:

Update 2019-12-20: This has been merged to master branch and shipped with the latest major release: Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.3.0.

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# D3D12 Memory Allocator 1.0.0

Mon
02
Sep 2019

Since 2017 I develop Vulkan Memory Allocator - a free, MIT-licensed C++ library that helps with GPU memory management for those who develop games or other graphics applications using Vulkan. Today we released a similar library for DirectX 12: D3D12 Memory Allocator, which I was preparing for some time. Because that's a project I do at my work at AMD rather than a personal project, I won't describe it in more details here, but just point to the official resources:

If you are interested in technical details and problems I had to consider during development or you want to write your own allocator for either Vulkan or Direct3D 12, you may also check my recent article: Differences in memory management between Direct3D 12 and Vulkan.

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# Slavic Game Jam 2019 and our project

Thu
25
Jul 2019

Over the last weekend I took part in Slavic Game Jam 2019 in Warsaw, Poland. (See website, Facebook event, games at itch.io). It was a big one - over 200 participants, many of them coming from different countries all around Europe. The event started on Thursday with a session of talks in 2 parallel tracks. In the evening there was a pre-party in VooDoo club, with electronic music played from GameBoys and live visuals. The jam started on Friday with the announcement of the theme which was "growth". As always, this was just an inspiration, so participants were free to make any kinds of games.

During the event there was food provided, as well as fruits and vegetables, coffee, and ice cream - all for free, included in the ticket price. Also during the event there was "HydePark" organized in a separate room - something like a small Slot Art Festival where people could reserve time slots to organize their events of any kind - like a talk, a workshop, playing video games, or playing some instruments. It made me wonder if people could come to SGJ, not make any game and still enjoy themselves all the time!

The official communication between the organizers and participants happened on a designated Discord server. Organizers kept us informed about everything what's important by posting announcements to @everyone. And there was a lot happening. For example, they asked us to deliver an exactly 3-second video from our games, from which they later assembled this showreel. They were also making quality photos and posting them during the jam on the Facebook event.

The deadline for games was on Sunday midday. What's interesting is that SGJ was non competitive this time. There were no presentations of the games on stage, no voting or judging by any jury, no winners or prizes. Instead of that, everyone needed to prepare their game to be played by others at their desk. I liked that. I think it might even feel somewhat like preparing a booth at some game expo if taken seriously. Finally, as every good party has a before- and after-party, so in the evening we went to a bar :)

To summarize, I think that in some way it's quite easy to organize a (normal) game jam. You need not invite speakers like for a conference. You need not provide any hardware, as people will bring their own laptops. All you need to do is to have some venue booked for a weekend, and some marketing to invite people to come. Possibly that's why there are so many of such events. My friend once said that taking part in game jams can become a lifestyle - you can go to one almost every week. But SGJ was different. There was so much happening and it was so well organized that I'm sure it required enormous work from everyone involved. Congratulations to the entire crew, KNTG Polygon group from Warsaw University of Technology, volunteers and others!

Regarding the games created during the jam, I could see most of them were developed using Unity. Other technologies were used as well. There were few mobile games, few board games... I couldn't see many VR games. I was developing a game in a team of two, together with my friend Thomas Pendragon - just two programmers. We were planning to use Unreal but we eventually used Unity. We ended up making this game: see entry at itch.io (including binary download for Windows and MacOS).

In our game, you need to "grow" your city by creating a balanced number of places of 5 types (red for building, green for park, blue for water, yellow for airport, gray for road). The city visualization on the left is just eye-candy. You play a tile-matching game like Candy Crush Saga, but with one twist. In the bottom-center there is a Tetris-like indicator that goes up every time you make a match of some color. When all colors are matched, the bottom row is cleared - like in Tetris. If any color goes all the way to the top, you lose, so you need to consider which colors do you match to keep a good balance. That makes the game more strategic. Points are calculated for every match - more if you match 4 or 5 in a row or if something else is matched in the same move. How many points can you reach? The record during the jam was above 1000.

Thomas gave initial idea and designed the game. He did some coding (like the city building on the left), composed the music, added sound effects, made some graphics in Blender, and assembled the rest from some assets. I coded the core logic of the matching game, the whole UI, and juicing, like particle effects and animations.

As a post-mortem of this little project, here is the list of what went right:

What went wrong?

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